Dave Thomas Keynote

Posted by kev Fri, 23 Jun 2006 14:37:00 GMT

What a year

  • 21 million hits on Google
  • Sidebar (how google makes their money) Advertising
    • Hosting
    • Training
    • Consulting
    • Custom project work
    • 65% of the No Fluf speakers are doing Rails work
    • Commercial IDEs for Rails
    • Most significant, ALTERNATIVES to Ruby on Rails
  • Rubyforge Downloads
    • Rails - 536,835 downloads
  • Ratings
    • Google Trends
      • Constantly increasing graph
      • In comparison to Websphere which is declining and evening out
      • Similar situation with jboss
      • We’ve passed Tapestry
      • We passed the “spring framework” a long time ago
      • We’ve passed zend
  • Thanks core!
  • Thanks Matz!
  • Everything is Perfect! BUT
    • Some work still needs doing
    • Hilbert, a mathmetician, gave a keynote analyzing the 23 most important unsolved problems in mathematics, setting the stage for the next century

23 Unsolved Problems Ran for about 7.5 hours, so…

3 Problems

  • PDI - Please Do Investigate
    • A bit rude
    • BUT, they’re right. There’s only 12 of them.
    • We’re all programmers. Try to implement it. It’s open.
    • The responsibility to make Rails the way we want is up to us.

Data Integration

  • Better use of schema - use schema constraints
    • Validation based on the schema (staying DRY)
    • Work with database foreign keys
      • It will help with enterprise integration
      • Make it easy to define in migrations
      • Add belongs_to if FK detected
      • Generally make folks feel we care
  • Primary keys
    • Better support for non-integer keys
      • Particularly in migrations
  • Add support for composite primary keys
  • Support distributed transactions
  • Standardized attribute-based finders
  • Non-database models (including JMS/MQ)

Real-world CRUD

  • The Irony - Scaffolding brings people to Rails BUT it’s the worst of Web 1.0
  • We need something that really handles the database
  • Support for table relationships
  • Configurability
  • In browser validation
  • AJAX!
  • Cross application skinning
  • What We’re Doing
    • Bring the simplicity of Active Record to Views and Controllers

Deployment

  • What do you do on the server?
    • Lightty, Mongrel, Apache, handling zombies?
  • Capistrano
    • Best deployment system there is
    • Lets make it better
    • Push model
      • Application contains all of the configuration information
      • What, where, how and when of deployment
      • Great when you own the entire development
      • BUT, in the real world responsibilities are split
      • Developers know what to deploy
      • Server administrators know where when and how
  • Capistrano II
    • Cooperative development
    • Decouple application requirements and server environments
    • Application Config
      • Where to find files
      • Where to put files
      • Pre and post development hooks
      • Library and environment prereqs
    • Server Config
      • Nominate server roles
      • Where files go on the server
      • User names/permissions/security
      • Including database passwords etc
    • Deployment
      • Set up server once
      • Set up individual applications as needed
      • cap --deploy-on cap://server.com
      • Sends application config to server
        • Server checks dependencies, etc
      • Stages application to server(s)
      • Installs (or not)
      • Then..
      • ISPs set up standard environment
      • Developers and users deploy:
      • svn co http://typosphere.org/typo cd typo cap --deploy-on cap://my.isp.com/dave
      • No more cron jobs for dead processes
      • Packaging
      • One step further…
        • Deploy from GEMS
        • Rails equivalent of WAR files
        • Deploy from GEM using:
        • gem deploy name --on cap://my.isp.com
        • gem update name --on cap://my.isp.com

Why?

  • We feel sorry for them
  • I couldn’t do Java development anymore
    • Rails and Ruby have corrupted me
  • It’s really hard to go back after Rails
  • I’d like the Rails community to embrace these people
    • Meet them halfway
    • Support what they need for the transition
  • All developers deserve to be happy

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